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U.s. 27, Us 22, Sandy 16, New York 11, Washington 11, Europe 10, Mississippi 10, London 8, United States 8, Fema 7, America 6, Germany 6, Stafford 5, Nicole Mitchell 5, Rupert Murdoch 5, Boston 5, Aljazeera America 5, Syria 5, Jazeera America 5, Lou Reed 4,
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  Al Jazeera America    News    News/Business. Breaking and in-depth news coverage  
   from America and around the world. New. (CC) (Stereo)  

    October 28, 2013
    7:00 - 9:01am EDT  

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>> good morning and welcome to aljazeera america on this monday. >> a group of european lawmakers arrived in washington today and want answers concerning the n.s.a. spying program. >> a number of reports almost all based on information leaked by former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden suggest the u.s. has been spying on many countries and their leaders, including important u.s. allies. >> the white house denies the report that president obama knew the n.s.a. was eavesdropping on german leader angela merkel. we have the latest. >> a nine member delegation will meet with senior government
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officials over allegations of widespread spying against leaders. new allegations surfaced that president obama approved spying on german chancellor angela merkel. according to the wall street journal, the president was unaware the n.s.a. was spying on world leaders and ordered the agency to stop some of the monitoring programs after learning of them. >> the president assured the chancellor that the united states is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor. >> it's not just the europeans who are upset. over the weekend, thousands marched on washington to express their outrage. >> against mass surveillance and i'm truly honored to speak for all whistle blowers. >> some members of congress say the latest allegations threaten to disrupt foreign policy with u.s. allies. >> i think the revelations from snowden and the secrets revealed are doing significant damage to
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our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries to where the suggestion is that we've listened in. i think we have repair work to do and hard questions to ask of the n.s.a. about what's really happening in this program. >> congressman peter king, the chairman of the house homeland security committee said america should stop apologizing. >> the reality is the n.s.a. has saved thousands of lives in the united states, france and germany and throughout europe. the french is someone to talk. they have carried out spying operations against the united states, both the government and industry. as far as germany, that's where the hamburg blot began which started 9/11. the french and germans and other european countries, we are not doing this for the fun of it. >> former vice president dick cheney agrees the u.s. should remain cautious. >> the overall capabilities are
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important and need to be preserved. >> it remains to be seen if the diplomacy will go over on the lawmakers' three day visit to washington this week. >> spain may be the latest u.s. ally targeted by the n.s.a. one of spain's largest newspapers claims the u.s. spy agency monitored 60 million phone calls last democratic. >> reports are based on information again from n.s.a. leaker edward snowden. >> a different kind of spying scandal. british news executives are in a london courtroom charged with hacking phones and bribing officials while working at the former "news of the world." dozens of witnesses are expected to be called and the trial is expected to run until next spring. >> there are a lot of layers to this case, phil, bring us up to speed. how did we get to this point?
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>> a number of defendants are facing conspiracy charges, rebekah brooks was a high ranking executive. the news was world has put out a number of groundbreaking scandalous stories. they were hacking people's phones. the police after a government inquiry brought charges against these news corps employees. they could face serious jail time. >> let's talk about that. you mentioned they could face serious jail time. what about fines? what implications could this possibly have moving forward?
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>> we are getting word andrea coulson could face up to 15 years in jail. the ramifications go well beyond these defendants and their jail time. this had has been a serious blow to the media within london and the u.k. and particularly to rupert murdoch. news corps was back at that time a u.s. registered company, so there is a u.s. angle to this. there also is possible implications that the phone hacking was done back in the states, as well. there are a lot of very serious ramifications to this. as this progresses, we'll see a lot of revelations. >> i know you'll be following all the latest details for us. real quick before we go here, there's a major storm battering london today, billed as one of the worst storms of the decade.
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how is this impacting the city, because all looks clear right now. >> well, it's a little windy and gusty, the skies are deceptively clear, but we are looking at a very serious storm today. the coast has been battered and we do expect it to come this way. you might see me later today holding an umbrella under a deluge of rain. >> hopefully not, be safe. thank you. >> ever since the federal health care website went on line earlier this month, it's been plagued by problems. now the hub is down halting enrollment. that hub verifies identities and incomes, key to determining eligibility and tax credits. the problem was caused by activity at a center owned by verizon. verizon said our engineers have been working with technology
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companies to identify and address the root cause of the issue. >> this is another headache for health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius. she is set to appear before a congressional committee this week. she will testify about problems with the rollout. the glitches are blamed for low enrollment. congress said she should step down if she can't firm the problems with healthcare.gov. >> the president has been poorly served in the implementation of his own signature legislation, so if somebody doesn't leave and there isn't a real restruckuring, not just a 60 day, somebody come in and try to fix it, then he's missing the point of management 101, which is these people are to serve him well and they haven't. >> before sebelius is grilled by congress, there will be a house hearing on tuesday. >> at least 66 people are dead after a wave of bombings across
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iraq. bombers struck shiite neighborhoods and baghdad sunday. there were more than 10 blasts, some car bombs. they are the latest in a surge of violence that has killed over 650 people this month and more than 5,000 this year. >> new video has surfaced showing last month's attempted assassination of egypt's interior minister, posted by an al-qaeda inspired group, showing a white s.u.v. driving up to his home. there you see it exploding. egyptian military officials confirm that a former army officer was behind the suicide bombing. the interior minister survived, but one person was killed and more than 20 others injured. >> russian president putin is planning to visit to egypt in hopes of ekindling military ties and gaining port access. the sunday times reports russia is trying to take advantage of the recent rift between
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washington and cairo. >> an eyewitness to the deadly 2012 attack in benghazi that killed four americans, including a u.s. ambassador is speaking out. the british security officer who is the first western witness to talk publicly about the attack spoke with 60 minutes on sunday, saying the attackers were explicitly targeting americans when they stormed the outpost in libya. he said he warned superiors for months over the lack of safety at the compound, adding that security guards were unarmed the night of the attack. >> anti american bill boards in iran's capital have been removed. the posters depicted the u.s. as a dishonest aggressor. officially, iran said the bill boards were not authorized but some suggest it was pushback against conservative hard liners. next week, a rally is planned called the grand day of death to america. it will coincide with the 34t 34th anniversary of the
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storming of the u.s. embassy in trahan. >> syria has met its first major deadline under an international plan to destroy its stockpile. an international weapons overseer is watching the process. 1,000 tons of chemical agents will be eliminated by next year. we are joined by our beirut correspondent. good to see you. what will the opcw be looking for in this filing and what conditions does it need to meet? >> i think they will be looking foremost on whether the declaration is exhaustive of all of syria's chemical we say programs and all the facilities there. now, they have been underground, haven't really had access to 18 out of the 23 sites that were declared in the informal declaration about a month ago. now it's a matter of seeing that
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everything is in that declaration, there is nothing hiding or that sir yes is not trying to consolidate somewhere some chemical weapons while giving away some other sites. that's the main issue. the second issue is where and how these chemical weapons are going to be destroyed. you know, the deadline is may of 2014. that's not very far away. there was one proposal at some point is to try to transfer some of those chemical agents and weapons to a third country, but that also has proven to be quite difficult at the moment. i think these are the two main issues here. >> all right, thanks. >> a foamer u.s. marine held hostage in columbia is a free man. rebels captured him in june while he was backpacking through the rebel-controlled area. he was turned over to sufficient officials at the airport in bogota. it's not clear by the rebels
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decided to lehim go. a veteran of the war in afghanistan had apparently ignored local officials who warned him not to hike in the area. >> now to that fierce storm battering parts of europe. it's creating plenty of headaches in the region. >> let's bring in meteorologist nicole mitchum. >> back with those high winds, the connector tunnel from england to france, they are going to have to shut it down and hillary clinton it for damage before they let people go. we have low pressure over europe, a little more into the north sea. very strong. what they were saying in england, usually they see these storms move across the atlantic and they've intensified before they hit england. this was still intensifying as it moved out. these are the areas with high winds gusts up to 70 miles per hour, some could gust higher. that's hurricane strength winds we're seeing across the area.
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we've had a low pressure moving into the north sea, just enough of a pressure gradient to cause all those problems. the more erratic the pressure change, the higher those winds kick up. this was a hard fall heading into the winter. a few weeks ago, when early know went all the way down to parts of southern germany and bavaria, it's going to be one of those seasons. we have a big system brewing into the west bringing areas of snow and much like what we're seeing in europe, some high winds. i'll talk about those in the next half hour. back to you guys. >> meteorologist nicole mitchell, thanks. >> for the first time since super storm sandy pounded the northeast, it is open to visitors. >> while some visits will remain closed, visitors can see the great haul, the first place immigrants saw arriving in the
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u.s. >> for more, let's go to john, who is on ellis island this morning. ellis island suffered terrible damage during sandy. how much of the facility will be open today for visitors? >> well, stephanie, good morning. it's a 27.5-acre site here. just to give you an indication of where we are actually sited, so you know, we're in the northern end of new york harbor. we'll get jimmy, our cameraman to pan over the financial district in manhattan. this site is most famous today for the american immigration museum, and tourists who do come here today for the first time in a year will see the famous halls and they'll see the big great hall where as tom was saying just now, immigrants got their first glance at the united states, and that famous staircase where immigrants were
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vetted by the doctors as they went up the staircase. the doctors was looking at them to see if they had diseased. many of them, 2% of the people who came here were sent home. what they won't see is the 1 million artifacts and documents they had to move from the island when it was flooded. they're all in climate controlled storage in maryland. >> the hot water and electrical systems were basically flooded under that water. do we have any idea when that work will be complete? >> ellis island is run by the national park service and it isn't giving very much away. they say don't expect any complete retoration of ellis island anytime soon. they do say that crews are working very hard to revamp the island to make sure the next time there's a hurricane sandy, and eight feet of water comes here, the island is about her able to cope. the park service is not giving
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us any cost estimation and not giving us any time estimation, either. they're using this as an opportunity to do the work that they should have done many years ago. of course, it was forced upon them by hurricane sandy. >> thanks, john. the statue of liberty happens to be 127 years old as well, today. that is a coincidence. >> it's nice to see it eopening, a place that welcomes to many people. >> we'll have more coming up in the show, but for now, an emotional farewell to a beloved teacher. >> friends and family members say goodbye to the young teacher whose life was cut short allegedly by one of her students. >> how one group of young victims is fighting back with a groundbreaking lawsuit.
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>> we're heading back to how many of still suffering after hurricane sandy. >> find out why your age could affect how much you like your job.
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>> welcome back. a funeral will be held this morning for the young massachusetts teacher murdered last week. on sunday, there was an outpouring of grief for the high school math teacher. working pink flowers in wonnor of her favorite color, mourners gathered to play respects. she was found behind the school. one of her students has been charged with her murder. he has pleaded not guilty. >> michigan governor rick snyder takes the stand today in detroit's bankruptcy trial. his testimony could help determine whether the city is eligible for chapter nine status. emergency manager hired by snyder filed the city for bankruptcy in july. public employee unions say the filing was meant to rob
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memberses of benefits and pensions. the decision must show good faith talks were held with creditors before filing. >> the guessing game over whether federal reserve policy makers will pull back from the stimulus program begins again. we are here with all the latest business headlines. >> it is a guessing game. last time around, investors were surprised. policy makers are set to meet tomorrow, affecting how much interest you are paying. the fed will continue buying $85 billion a month in bonds to keep interest rates low so companies can borrow cheap money, invest and clay jobs. chairman ben bernanke pledged to keep pitching money into the economy until there is solid evidence the jobs market is turning around. two economic reports could move the market today. the federal reserve will release the industrial production numbers for september.
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it was delayed a few weeks because of the government shutdown. the national association of realtors releases its pending home sales tax index for september. ahead of all that today, stock futures this morning are higher, traders are looking to continue last week's major streak. thanks to all earnings, all three indexes are close to record highs. the dow is near 15,600, 1% from an all time high. the s&p opening about 1760. the nasdaq is 39,043. traders overseas are waiting until u.s. data comes out. asian markets are starting strong after wall street made so much money last week. nikki gained 2%.
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shanghai is up a fraction. >> the biggest name on the earnings list today is apple. apple's going to let us know how much money it made this quarter after markets closed. it was showing off the ipad air, but it's the iphone bringing in most of the money for apple. it brings in more than half its profit. it's the company's highest profit gadget. >> i think it's going to come town to iphone 5s and 5c. sales. the company issued the report that they saw record numbers for the first three days of sales, so all signs point to sales being particularly strong. >> apple stock is down, actually, about 1% this year. >> toyota is still the world's top selling car-maker. its latest sales physician show it sold 7.5 million vehicles for
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the first half of this year. for the second year in a row, it has sold more vehicles than general motors despite sudden acceleration problems in some cars. >> the older you are, the happier you are likely to be at work. a new study finds nine in 10 workers who are 50 years and older say they are very or somewhat satisfied with their job. >> that seems surprising and counter intuitive. is it across the board? >> according to the survey, this is across the board. we are talking about race, we're talking about education levels, income levels. it turns out the older you are, it seems you are more satisfied. respondents say that folks are more likely to ask them for advice and get more respect on the job. >> why are younger workers not as satisfied. >> it has to do with finding out
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who your in the workforce. the workforce has had a dramatic shift in the last two decades. according to figures, we see american changing jobs, not careers, but jobs around 10 times in a lifetime. that's significant. for millennials, it's more than that. >> sometimes out of necessity. >> it is a shocking statistic, one in five women will be sexually assaulted during their college years. colleges are increasingly coming under fire for failing to protect their students. america tonight is focusing on the problem in a special series called "sex crimes on campus." >> my head was slammed into a bathroom door and then again next to the toilet and the assault proceeded. >> i remember putting my hands on the sink and just looking at myself in the mirror, and not even being able to fully comprehend what had just happened. >> these women say they were raped at a place mow of us
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assume will be a haven of learning, and of safety, college. annie was a freshman, and andrea a sophomore each attending u.n.c., the university of north carolina at chapel hill. >> is the school lying? >> the interesting thing with the university as a whole with sexual violence, they treat it as a compliance issue. >> one in 20 college women in the united states will be the victim of a completed or attempted rape in a typical college year. according to the national violence against women's survey in 2000, the most recent figure available. >> this is an easy thing to do. put a blue light on campus, have a campus security guard. >> since 1972, the u.s. department of education under title nine of the civil rights act has said institutions receiving federal funds must insure an education free of sexual discrimination.
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many colleges and universities say they were unaware of their legal obligations under title nine to also protect students from sexual assault. >> we absolutely put much more emphasis on preventing plagiarism than preventing rape. that is a reality. >> though annie graduated, in 2012, she and andrea found each other. they began to talk about the issue of rape at the university of north carolina. >> we said u.n.c. isn't a bad place. u.n.c. is a representation of a larger cultural problem. >> the women gap researching title nine, interviewing other victims of rape, utilizing social media and in january of 2013, along with former u.n.c. administrator and two others filed a federal complaint against the university of north car liner in a at the department of education. >> when you have 18 and 19-year-old men and women who are holding the government accountable for rape, like it
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just -- it boggles my mind. >> as for the former students, they have a mission to bring light into a part of campus life that has been too long in the shadow. joie chen, aljazeera, capitol hill. >> once again, aljazeera is taking a look at sex crimes in campus starting tonight. >> to neat, they will focus on the role alcohol often plays and how victims can be made to feel they are to blame. >> one year after the devastating hurricane sandy, many in the hardest hit areas have come all the way back. >> many others of still suffering and in desperate need of help. >> in search for answers to the nation's worst prison rebellion, pressure is building to reopen the documents from a 1971 at da riot. >> his gritty songs were inspired by the streets of new york and they had a lasting
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impact on countless other physicians. we remember his life. >> another day, another crazy ending in the fall classic world series game. highlights coming up in sports. on inside story, we bring together unexpected voices closest to the story, invite hard-hitting debate and desenting views and always explore issues relevant to you.
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(vo) al jazeera america we understand that every news story begins and ends with people. >> the efforts are focused on rescuing stranded residents. (vo) we pursue that story beyond the headline, past the spokesperson, to the streets. >> thousands of riot police deployed across the capitol. (vo) we put all of our global resources behind every story. >> it is a scene of utter devastation. (vo) and follow it no matter where it leads, all the way to you.
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al jazeera america. take a new look at news. >> good morning. welcome back. mississippi is one of the sickest and poorest states in the country. >> so far, only a few dozen people have signed up for the new affordable health care plan. aljazeera went there to find out why. >> this chef is the sole provider for his family of four
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and says for the last year and a half they haven't been able to afford insurance. >> i worry about that every day. all it takes is one accident and you could be $20,000 to $100,000 in debt or more than that. you never know. >> he and his wife are searching for health care, but couldn't get on the new federal health care exchange website. in jackson, barbershop owner chris page and his customer terry harper say they have insurance, but both plan to look at their options under the a.c.a. >> i may get better coverage for the same amount i'm paying, because i just got the minimum level coverage so i can at least be covered if something was to happen. >> neither page nor harper have gone on line to compare rates. >> i haven't, because they say every time you try to go log in, there was something wrong with why you couldn't sign up, and you had computer glitches. >> mississippi is the only state that applied to run its own
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health care exchange and was rejected because of concerns the state wouldn't provide enough support for it. that leaves people here trying to use the troubled federal exchange. as of october 21, only 35 people had signed up. health care advocates are playing catch up. >> a lot of the advocacy groups, provider groups did a lot of work preparing for a mississippi-based exchange, so we've been behind other states in trying to get the word out about the exchange. >> this man is training to be a federally funded navigator, a person who helps people deal with the new health care marketplace. >> right now, our focus is enrolling the people in mississippi to get health insurance and tax credits they are eligible for. >> many residents don't have internet access or even computers. >> mississippi is the unhealthiest state in the
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station with the third highest premiums in the country. it only received $1 million in federal aid to publicize the plan. arkansas received $24 million. >> the university of mississippi medical center got most that have money, $800,000. its navigators have helped 4,000 patients. cover mississippi.org which got less money is mapping out a statewide outreach effort to bring computers to the people. >> there's a need for more funding in mississippi. we're a state you're going to have to go out and knock on doors to help people enroll in these plans and walk people through the process. >> chris miller may take another look at the health care exchanges, but will wait until the federal website is more reliable. aljazeera, mississippi. >> a spokesman for human in a said the company is in a quiet
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period until 30 company earnings are released next month. >> parts of the west are getting another taste of winter in the form of more snow. >> snow is on the way. for more, let's bring back nicole mitchell. >> we're getting that time of year where this is getting a little more common out there. a lot of us think it's still early for the white stuff, but what we're seeing today is a potent system in the midwest. you can see colors on the radar cadeing snow in areas like montana, and rain if you're a little south of this, but with this system, we're also seeing very high wednesday. that's going to add to the problems. some of these places outlined in the darker colors, these are the winter storm warnings, so you're looking at the lower elevation, a couple inches up to a half foot of snow. higher elevations, half a foot and more in some cases, but because of the winds, we've got easily 20-30 plus mile an hour winds blowing that. that will make that treacherous on the road.
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the area highlighted in pink is freezing rain potential. that really coats it and makes the driving an ice rink. southward, we're seeing the high wind potential. you can see the different colors extending from utah into california. wind, 30-40 miles per hour, some gusting as high as 60 makes the driving very difficult, especially if you're in a high profile vehicle. the west was very quiet last week, complete reversal this week. a lot of the moisture hasn't made it here yet, but we'll see heavy rain potential in kansas, nebraska. not out of the question we could see stronger storms as all of this moves through, and it's also dropping temperatures. temperatures this morning, if you're headed out to billings where we have the potential for snow, 30 degrees. temperatures at our high today,
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minneapolis at 43. to the east coast, we finally started to warm back into the 60's, but with a shot of cooler air in the east coast and system pulling out from the west, a lot of these temperatures go back down. the east coast goes back into 50's for tomorrow. believe it or not, minnesota dropped a couple of degrees, like we weren't cold enough with those temperatures in the 40's, we go from mid 40's to low 40's. the warm stuff still across the south, if you are looking for sunshine, may be head to houston with a high temperature of 84. back to you. >> new york state attorney general is asking a judge to release sealed records about the 1971attica prison riot, with details of the bloody uprising at the maximum security prison in western new york state. tate troopers and prison guards stormed the facility, fatally shooting 29 inmates and 10
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hostages. >> 30,000 runners laced up for the annual marine corps marathon. the 26.2-mile race is the third largest marathon in the country. it ended at the marine corps war memorial in d.c. security was heightened during the race which comes just six months after the boston marathon bombing. >> another crazy finish to a world series game. >> and controversial. we have the details. >> saturday night, we saw world series game, the first world series game ever on an obstruction call, whatever that is. sunday's game four would feature another game ending first. here's how they got there. bottom of the third, no score, motte carpenter, he's on second, carlos beltran at the plate and singling to right center. carpenter scores, take a 1-0 lead. red sox with the bases loaded, nobody out, drew to left.
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ortiz tags on third and lumbers home, in there safe and sound. that's all boston would get in that inning. next inning, two on, to out for jonny gomes. he comes up big with the play. that's a three-run homer, giving boston a 4-1 lead. cards trail by two with a runner in scoring position. game two starter john lackey on in relief gets a groundout to short to end the inning. bottom of the ninth, long is about to make heavy bill bucknor style. with beltran at the plate, he gets picked off first base to end the game. first walk off pick off in world series heavy. red sox even the series at two games apiece by winning game four. >> the red sox showed their character tonight putting that heartbreaking game three loss behind them and focusing on game
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four. the guy who was the star of the show wasn't even supposed to be in the starting lineup. jonny gomes in for the injured shane victorino, who had tight in hisness back. making the start, he gets the huge three-run homer in the sixth, giving the red sox a 4-1 lead and proves to be eventually the game winner. now the series is tied at two games apiece. >> there's one thing i fought for since i signed up for this game and that's the opportunity. whether that's a pinch-hit, whether a uniform, or whether that's a start, you know, so when my number's called, i got to be ready. i got in the box and took some hacks. >> we needed it. we had a good offensive team and i know we have guys capable to get it done. they got to go fishing, but they turned the ball over the plate. >> the game ended in an unlikely manner, but this time, advantage red sox. monday night, both teams sending
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their aces to the hill, adam wainwright and john lester. reporting for aljazeera from the world series in st. louis. >> thank you. now we sample from the nfl. the chiefs were busy trying to stay unbelievably unbeaten and untied. don't let the chance that the chiefs led this one fool you. smith right there. new starting quarterback jason campbell threw for nearly 300 yards. couldn't find the handle. k.c. wins to move to 8-0. >> the game of the day went down in motown. calvin johnson takes the pass, goes 87 yards before taken down on the 3-yard line. there was more magic where that came from. romo hits williams, who hits the
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accelerator and 60 yards later after taking a break for this slick move hits the end zone. dallas led by six. stafford hits johnson, final 22 yards, seven yards shy of the record. stafford hustles everyone up to the line, cowboys are not paying attention. stafford sneaks up and over. reggie bush pushes him in just in case, touchdown lions, they rally for a win. that's sports at this hour. >> even more exciting the second time around. >> third, fourth and fifth. >> megatron magic. >> that seems like an oddly anti climatic touchdown in a way, but a great world series. >> i predict that the team clad in red will win. >> fighting words here. john henry smith, thank you. >> fans around the world, myself
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included, are mourning the death of new york rock legend lou reed. he died at the age of 79. his gritty lyrics and hard-edged sound helped change the face of rock and roll approximate he inspired david bowie, u.2 and countless other artists. ♪ ♪ >> life was expressed through music, his band, "the velvet underground" set the role for rock in the punk movement. >> for a lot of people who like sort of underground music, he was as important as the beatles. >> in the 1960's, lou reed and other iconic music figures called this place home at one time or another. they used this hotel as
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inspiration. >> fans dropped off flowers. >> the fan of the underground was years ahead of their time, lou reed, you know, he sort of is the father of punk rock. >> when i was in high cool, i mean growing up in a small town and listening to that kind of music, it was just so bizarre compared to the country music i listened to. >> as influential as it was, their first album sold few copies. >> the classic quote about "the velvet underground" is that 35,000 bought records, but every one went on to start a rock band. so much of what lou did presaged punk and everything that became called alternative rock. ♪ take a walk on the wild side." >> he had success after the
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velvet underground broke up. >> he never stopped changing. he did have some commercial success with transformer, an album produced by david bowie. >> he made no secret of his problems with drugs and alcohol. he underwent a liver transplant earlier this year. the velvet underground was inducted into the how many in 1996. he collaborated with metallica and last year toured with his new band. he also contributed vocals to metric's 2012 album. ♪ ♪ >> it will be his time with the very well set underground that most fans will remember when they think of lou reed. aljazeera. >> he made a stamp on song writing by deviling into subject
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matters that had never been discussed before, about heroin and taking a walk on the wild side helped cement his status as a rock legend. he was known for his long running fused with rock journalists. incidentally, he was influenced by bob dylan. you can kind of hear that in his music, but other than that little influence you hear vocally, his influence was so unique. >> he tackled so many taboo topics. he didn't sugar coat things. >> i was really into him freshman year of college. he was open about his struggles with addiction, drugs and alcohol, but left an unquestionable lasting legacy in music. >> he was really a legend. >> the ocean had her way with us, but here we are, pretty much back to the normal. >> one year later, the fight to
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bounce back from super storm sandy. >> we hear from folks in the hardest hit areas on the progress of rebuilding and challenges that still remain. what happens when social media
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uncovers unheard, fascinatin
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>> tomorrow marks one year since super storm sandy slammed into the coastal communities of new york and new jersey, displacing thousands. >> while some have bounced back, many still struggle. we have put together a series of special reports. we have more. erika. >> if you got a group of storm victims together right now and asked them how rebuilding is going, you'll get very different responses. today's story is truly a tale of two recovers. we look at a couple of areas hit hard and how one year makes all the difference for one and none for the other. >> on a blustery october day
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with waves primed for surfing and a boardwalk fit for strolling, this part of the jersey shore looks pretty good considering the bad that ravaged the town one year ago. you can still see remnants of super storm sandy, but belmont, new jersey bounced back. >> here we are, pretty much back to the normal. >> frank owns d.j.'s bar and grill, a shore staple. it was hit hard. >> the ocean came in, broke through all the windows and doors. the next day, there were pieces of the boardwalk all over the place. part of our kitchen floor collapsed, our prep kitchen was ruined. >> the damage totaled $1.4 million. his insurance paid the maximum policy limit and fema helped. that plus a small bank loan put him back in business. the bar had a problemmable
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summer. >> the government did its job this time around. >> an aggressive effort was made to rebuild. >> without the boardwalk, we would have been toast. >> rebuilding that 1.5-mile walk way was vital to the community. >> we've had a boardwalk since 1875. it is part of the character of the town. we have 145 small businesses in town that depend on tourists culling in the summer months. >> it took $10.4 million to build it from scratch. fema paid for almost all of it. seven months later, it was in place, made of synthetic wood, complete with hurricane straps, this one is strong enough to withstand another super storm. >> with a brand new boardwalk and most business owners back, it is a contrast to other shoreline communities slammed by the storm. like in stanton island, new york, where people are still struggling to rebuild. >> that's where i keep it, right
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in the box. >> still without a finished kitchen, the floodwaters forced them to rebuild their home inside and out. the price tag, nearly $160,000. they say they received some relief from their homeowners college, but not much from flood insurance and less from the government. >> a year later, we're told fema is not going to help us. >> that includes elevating their home to meet new flood insurance standards. that comes at a cost at up to $10,000 a foot, and could mean another $50,000. they won't know how high to go until flood maps are finished. >> we were told if you put down ceramic tile and hang cabinets, we'll be taking a chance on breaching everything. we've been on hold, waiting for flood maps, waiting to get in touch with the architect.
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it's probably easier for us to walk away at this point. >> instead, they're in it for the long haul, though some are long gone. >> besides the two abandoned houses on this side, now i have the house on this side for sale. the house next to it, they're getting ready to demo the house, so the entire neighborhood has changed. >> businesses were forced to pull out, too, at least for a little while, like rainbow bridge productions and morrisey contracting. >> we worked for a long time to get hour headquarters. i've been running our business out of our home and we were literally ready to roll open the doors for business a week or so before the storm hit, and it just came, and just took everything. >> it took all year for him to get his businesses back up and running, because the storm took out his home, too. >> our house was devastated. it was ripped off the foundation. >> joe, his wife and two young
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children moved from place to place off fema rem assistance until recently. >> you have to reapply every three months. i just reapplied for the next three months and they denied me. >> it's just... >> for them, the recovery has been overwhelming. [ crying ] >> while he admits he does not know what will happen tomorrow. >> we do not want to let sandy dictate our lives, and with we never will. >> which is why this mother is set on searching her family a homemade holiday meal, their first in two years. >> that's the purpose of getting a stove without having a floor down yet, was so that we could cook the turkey, and i don't care if we sit around the coffee table, it doesn't matter, i'm having thanksgiving in my house. >> it's that determination that keeps these survivors forging ahead in hopes that someday it
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will be behind them like it is for new jersey a year after sandy stormed ashore. >> despite the ocean did what it did, i have a new found appreciation for how lucky i am to live here. i look at the ocean with new eyes again, even though i've been here for 45 years now. looking at it every day, i'm seeing it for the first time, and i'm digging it. >> super storm sandy killed more than 150 people and damaged more than 650,000 homes. a few months after the storm, congress approved a $50 billion sandy relief bill, but many we spoke to say much of that money has yet to reach the people who need it. >> so heartbreaking. what do you do when you run out of rental assistance, you still to have pay your mortgage, but you're without a home and don't have the money for a rebel. the american red cross has been simply amazing. they received millions of dollars, but it's not just the big organizations helping out.
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>> this is the beautiful thing that has come out of this entire experience. i saw a lot of camaraderie within communities where regular folks were just starting up charities and starting up non-profits that are still helping people to this day. >> you always see so much good in these tragedies. thank you so much. >> coming up in the next hour. >> we do have a little more coming up in the next half hour here. that we'll focus on a group that hasn't gotten a lot of attention and how, and those are children, how emotional challenging recovery have been for them. >> grandpa was scared, my mom was scared, my dad was scared, i was scared, everyone. [ crying ] >> much more coming from this great group of kids reflecting on the storm and its aftermath through their eyes and in their own words, really powerful
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moments from the children of sandy. that's coming up in our next half hour. change, we look forward to that report. >> at the end of our first hour, here's what we're following this morning. european union members set to arrive in washington today to discuss the latest revelations about the u.s. reportedly spying on leaders overseas. >> a new glove is hitting the federal health care website. the so-called data hub is down, halting on line enrollment. >> i'm meteorologist nicole mitchell. after a quiet stretch last week, it's the wild west for parts of our forecast. where wind and snow will be a problem. >> aljazeera america continues with del walters. we're back with you in two and a half minutes. stay with us.
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what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? >> they share it on the stream. >> social media isn't an after-thought, it drives discussion across america. >> al jazeera america's social media community, on tv and online. >> this is your outlet for those conversations. >> post, upload and interact. >> every night share undiscovered stories.
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>> there are new headaches for users of the federal health care website, as yet another technical glitch brings the site crashing down. >> the white house denies reports that president obama knew about the n.s.a. spying on german chancellor and other leaders. this as european lawmakers head to washington to discuss the growing spy scandal. >> i was like are we going to lose our lives? >> the youngest victims of hurricane sandy. a look at the youngest victims who survived the super storm. >> relics dating back 200 years found underground in new york city.
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>> good morning, welcome to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. a group of european lawmakers arriving today in washington want answers about american spying. recent reports say the u.s. has been tapping the phones of several european leaders. many of them are long time friends. that information is based on leaks from former n.s.a. contractors edward snowden. the white house denies reports that the president new anything about the eaves dropping on angela merkel. >> leaders will meet with senior u.s. government and intelligence officials over allegations of widespread spying by the n.s.a. against e.u. citizens and leaders. new allegations surfaced that president obama approved spying on german chancellor angela
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merkel. according to the wall street journal, the penalty was unaware leaders were being speed on and ordered it stopped after learning of it. >> the president assured that the united states will not monitor the communications of the chancellor. >> it's not just the europeans who were upset. thousands marched on washington to express outrage. >> we're against mass is your vials and i'm truly honored to speak for all whistle blowers. >> members of congress say the latest allegations threaten to disrupt foreign policy with u.s. allies. >> i think the revelations from snowden and the secrets that have been revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries where the suggestion is that we've listened in. >> the chairman of the house
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home land security said america should stop apologizing. >> the n.s.a. ho saved thousands of lives in the united states, france and germany and throughout europe. >> former vice president dick cheney agrees the u.s. should remain cautious. >> our overall intelligence capabilities are important to the security of this nation and need to be preserved. >> it remains to be seen if that will go over so smoothly with european lawmakers on their visit to washington this week. >> the latest ally that may have been speed on by the u.s. is spain. one of that countries largest newspapers reports that the n.s.a. monitored 60 million phone calls there last december. like the earlier reports saying assertions are based on leaks from edward snowden. >> a different spying scandal to focus in london. british news executives are inside a courtroom there charged with hacking phones and bribing
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finishes while working at the former rupert murdoch-owned news of the world. that trial is expected to run through spring. phil ittner is live in london. can you update us? >> the case centers around those phone hacking accusations, and there are eight members of -- or former members of rupert murdochs news corporation who are inside the courtroom behind me. they are facing conspiracy charges, and this could be a big blow to rupert murdoch and news corporation, because it may be revealed that an awful lot of money was being funneled through in a quite unethical manner to get scoops and stories. the today is just the first day,
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and this will be jury selection, but an awful lot of people not only here, but around the globe are waiting to see what revelations will come out of this court case especially since news corporation is a u.s. registered company. >> what are the consequences, could these people face jail time or just fines? >> they're facing jail time, and a number of years. we are hearing from inside the camp of one of the defendants, andy coulson that they expect if they do get a guilty verdict, that they're looking at at least six years in jail, so, you know, this has some serious consequences, not only for the jail time they may face, but the revelations that may come out and however this may go up the food chain within news corporation and whether or not this will actually touch upon rupert murdoch himself. >> like the n.s.a. spying scandal here, this particular
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scandal in london has had some pretty big names attached to it. >> oh, yeah, absolutely, not the least of which rupert murdoch. james murdoch was actually here during this period, rupert murdoch's son was very much involved in the news of the world, so this could go much larger than just the eight defendants who are here today. dell. >> phil ittner joining us live from london, thank you very much. >> some are saying here we go again, flips slowing the federal health care website to a crawl, but this morning, a new glitch shutting it down fleet for a while. the problem is called the data hub problem. it verifies applicant identities and their incomes. the data is needed to determine eligibility for tax credits that would lower insurance premiums. the glitch this time caused by a
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connectivity issue at a center owned by verizon. verizon has said. this latest failure another headache for health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius. congress saying she should not stay in her job if she can't fix the website. >> the president has been poorly served in the implementation of his own signature legislation, so if somebody doesn't leave, and if there isn't a real restructuring, not just a 60 day somebody come in and try to fix it, then he's missing the point of management 101, which is these people are to serve him well and they haven't. >> now, before sebelius is grilled, there is a house hearing on tuesday. >> the fierce storms in london
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are batters parts of britain and creating headaches there. you can see him with that scarf on. we return to nicole mitchell. >> we do expect the cold air this time of year, we can get potent storms, because they barrel across the atlantic and by the time they hit, there's not anything to block that. this storm, usually the intensification as the storms come across are kind of finished by the time they hit he can gland. this kept intensifying. the lower the pressure, the stronger the winds. this has been cranking up those winds. they are checking the chunle to make sure it's ok. some wind gusts over 70 miles per hour expected, that is what we would consider hurricane force winds and low pressure moving over the north sea.
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but you can see high impact of winds with that pressure change. this has been a tough season for parts of europe. this is snow in germany, where they have gotten more into halloween the last few years. early season snow system went all the way to southern parts of bolivaria. we are back with the winter whether here, as well. >> we return now to our top story going in depth, the latest allegations with the n.s.a. newspapering on overseas governments and their leaders approximate it has ruffled a lot of feathers. joining us is the senior editor of foreign affairs. thanks for being with us. there are knows german press reports that indicate that
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president obama was aware that the u.s. was spying on german chancellor angela mechanical. he said he was not. does it make a difference if you're the german leader? >> i think it does if the relationship is base said on a certain level of trust. i think there would be surprise from a head of state to know that his personal communications were being monitored. i expect that the expressions of understanding that the german chancellor offered months ago, when the programs, the larger promise were first revealed might reconsider if they knew you that was this sort of intense monitoring of the personal communications of officials. i think that that particular report doesn't seem particularly solid at this point. most of the other reporting we've seen indicates that at least there's a certain level of plausible deniability. >> i talked to intelligence that
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said that the international community needs to grow up and that reporters need to ask the european leaders did they spy on the u.s., and they said that americans would be surprised at the answer that is they received. your take on that? >> that's a great point. it's not just on the u.s., but also on one another. i think it's probably a safe bet that if the french are upset about something, the germans are upset about something, it's very likely that they're not only trying to spy on the u.s., but also on one another. the question here is is a line crossed when you talk about targeting of a particular individual head of state, and i think another line you have to wonder about being crossed is the pure scope of this program, the amount of information being collected. a lot of people in europe reading these reports are upset he about the idea that millions, tens of millions of germans or spanish or french citizens having their communications
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monitored. i think that is something that seems new to some people. >> a top secret program called echelon, all these countries indicated that they were going to collect megadata from around the globe. are we seeing something where people are acting outraged for the public but behind doors saying we are caught? >> there are domestic constituencies, a lot of outrage. i think in the talks that we understand are going to be happening about this, what these revelations are going to mean for german leaders or french leaders is really about getting leverage over the united states and sort of working out a new set of rules. keep in mind, there's a certain irony coming up with rules about breaking the rules. >> as they say and probably listen to, stay tuned.
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thank you for being with us. >> for the first time since super storm sandy pounded the northeast, ellis island now open to visitors. it was extensively damaged when sandy hit new york. while some exhibits are going to remain closed, visitors will see the great hall, the first place that millions of immigrants saw when they first arrived on america's shores. we go live to ellis island. how much of this particular facility will be open today for visitors? >> it's a 27.5-acre site here. i'm just going to step out of the camera now and let our cameraman show you the main building here. the whole island was inundated by water during hurricane sandy. there was a 14-foot storm surge,
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eight-foot of water hanging around here. visitors coming back today will see the great hall as you're looking at now, the staircases and hall ways. what you won't see is the more than 1 million documents and photos and artifacts, because they've had to be removed. many things have been donated to people who's families were processed here. they've been taken out. they're in a climb controlled storage chamber in maryland. they have to wait until the humidity comes back to check that they've got the air conditioning right before moving that back in. if you come, you'll get a tremendous experience. >> you mentioned specifically hot water, electrical systems, eight feet of water covering them, do we know when all of that repair work is going to be done? >> it was the bailer systems, the electrical systems, completely wiped out by this storm. the answers we don't know for certain. the national park service is being quite quiet about that, saying that there will be no
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complete restoration of the island for quite a while, saying crews are working to revamp the island to make sure when the next storm comes along it isn't as badly affected as it was by hurricane sandy. they are not giving a cost estimate or time frame, either. >> lady liberty, 127 years old, the statue also sustaining damage. how does she look? >> she was closed of course for the government shutdown, as well. i can see lady liberty. there are t.v. trucks in the way, we can't turn the cameras around. there's no coincidence in this whatsoever. the park service have reopened this day quite deliberately to celebrate and commemorate the statue of liberty, and also it's one year since hurricane sandy. also, of course, on the pedestal is that poem in brass by the poet who wrote give me your tired, your poor, your huddled
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masses, yearning to breathe free. that's pretty much part of ethos of ellis island. 12 million immigrants came into this country via this island. >> you couldn't see lady liberty, but we could, john, thank you very much. >> oh! >> still ahead on aljazeera america, on target for construction, syria handing over a plan to eliminate its chemical weapons stockpile, the government committing to destroying its entire arsenal by next year. >> speaking out for the first time, a deadly witness to benghazi, the attack there. >> some older employees have some surprising things to say about working, why they say it actually gets better with age. >> listen up, you may have retirement money you didn't know you have. i'll tell you about billions of dollars in lost 401k cash.
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>> syria has met its first major deadline, the government submitting plans to destroy its chemical weapons stockpile. a wave dog group overseeing the process, syria says it will eliminate its arsenal by next year. that stockpile now said to contain 1,000 tons of chemical weapons. >> a new video was posted by a group claiming to be inspired by al-qaeda shows a s.u.v. exploding. egyptian military officials confirm a former army officer was behind the suicide bombing. the interior minister survived, but only one person and 20 others were injured, one of those people being killed. >> an eyewitness to that deadly attack last year in benghazi that killed four americans, including the u.s. ambassador is now speaking out. the british security officer speaking to 60 minutes on cbs is the first western witness to do
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so. he said the attacks were targeting americans when they stormed the outpost in libya. he warned his superiors for months about the lack of safety at that particular compound, adding that security guards were no the armed that particular night. >> if you're not happy with your job, you might plan on sticking around for a while. those are the findings by the associated press center for public affairs research. they found that nine in 10 workers age 50 or older say they are somewhat or very satisfied with their jobs, older workers reporting satisfaction. 38% of the younger adults express deep satisfaction with their jobs. >> the new trading week, the attention back on the fed. we have all of the business headlines. >> everyone will be focused on the fed, policy makers meeting
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this week. this could affect the overall economy and how much interest you are paying. many economists believe the fed will continue buying ate $5 billion a month in bonds to keep interest rates low so that companies can get cheap money, invest in new businesses and create more jobs. chairman ben bernanke pledged to keep pumping money into the economy until there is solid evidence of the job market turning around. millions of americans still can't find work. two economic reports could move markets. the federal reserve will release the production in connection for september. it was delayed because of the government shut down. the national association of realtors releases its pending home sales index for september. we are hours away from getting that data. right now, soft futures are pretty much flat after last week's big gains. investors are looking to keep the good times rolling. strong earnings pushed record highs friday. the dow was near 15,600, just
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about 1% from the all-time high. the snp500 opened at about 1760. the nasdaq is at a 13 year high. overseas, european stock are all over the place. they are waiting nor new u.s. date to to decide whether best to buy or sell. nikkei gained more than 2%, hong kong up a half% and shining high up a fraction. apple will announce its quarterly financial results after markets closed. last week, it showed off the ipad air, but it's the iphone that brings in more than half of apple's profit. it's the highest margin damage jed. >> even with the launch of the ipad air, i think they're
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showing that they're trying to be aggressive with their product. it is a post steve jobs era and they need to figure out their game plan in order to kind of stimulate that fast growth that they once enjoyed in the jobs era. >> for this year, apple stock is actually down about a%. >> the effect of the government shut down are making economists less optimistic about u.s. growth. 63% believe the dysfunction in washington is hurting the economy. you could be one of millions of americans who have a loft retirement account, money that belongs to you collecting dust in a plan you may not know exist. we speak with a 401k hunter, a man contracted by the government to find you. he says when he calls people, he often gets the strangest
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reactions. >> they pretty much just say, you know, some choice four letter words. i'm like no, we really have money for you. >> that's real money. find out if one of these accounts could belong to you, tonight on real money with ali velshi. >> i will give you my social security number now. how much money are we talking about being lost? >> billions of dollars, these sleep lie accounts you may not know exist. these investment companies don't want to keep it. it costs them, too. it's in everybody's best interesting, it's yours, you get it. >> how do i get it back? >> we're going to led you need to get the money you deserve that's yours. >> i will be watching and like i said, my social security number will be on your ipad. thanks a lot. >> these days, you can get an app to do just about anything on
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your smart phone. tech developers are creating computers that you can wear. the privacy concern surrounding this. >> here no the war room at the at&t hack-a-thon, it's about creating ideas that will because the next big thing in technology you are wear. >> by night, i'm a fashion designer. >> perched over a sewing machine, skills are merged. >> we turn this entire glove you into a circuit board. >> to turn a glove that can be turned into an air guitar and maybe one day something that can change someone's live. >> creating something with where people who are challenged in terms of mobility have the ability to interact with computers in some very exciting ways. >> oh, yeah, you got the
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embedded stuff going, ok. >> it was in vented three years ago. >> coming to hack-a-thon, social events and finding the experts that are in the room that have already gathered there and asking the questions they need to level up on the knowledge. >> hack-a-thon by definition is taking one type of technology or product and making it do something else. take jose torres' product, a sensor inside a shoe. it could be used to monitor activity or track movements for video games. >> we want to start getting creative people, developers, designers, hackers onboard to play around with the possibility. >> a big part of hack-a-thons like this one are to find innovative ways to use executiving neck following this. this brain reader attaches to your head and based on that's happening inside of it, the cat ears move. >> on these type of devices, brainwaves can be recorded, shared and perhaps used for
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marketing purposes. >> there's great concerns in who has access to that data and how transparent are they. >> technology professor wears a watch that tracks how much he exercises, but he doesn't share that information where third party's could if they wanted to collect the data. >> who's going to use that data? eventually as the health care system against more expensive, can insurance companies say we looked at how much exercise you did today, we looked at your fridge, we'll give you a discount or we're going to charge you more, right? >> as apps become more common place, so are concerns about how they can help and possibly hurt our lives. aljazeera, seattle. >> here's a hint. do not buy me those bunny ears or christmas. >> the top five times from the event pitch their ideas to
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experts in the industry with hopes that their projects will make it to the marketplace and a phone near you. >> still ahead, the youngest victims of hurricane sandy talk about the emotional toll the super storm took on them and how many families still trying to cope. >> history beneath our feet. new york city uncovering relics that are hundreds of years old. >> you are getting bunny ears for christmas. another day, another crazy ending in the world series gales. coming up, in sports. college campuses. >> i know that when i did report, i was blamed. >> then this friday at nine eastern, we open up the conversation in a live town-hall event. sex crimes on campus, a special week of coverage and live town-hall on america tonight
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nine eastern. only on al jazeera america.
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>> the most important money stories of the day might affect your savings, your job or your retirement. whether its bail-outs or bond rates this stuff get complicated. but don't worry. i'm here to take the fear out of finance. every night on my show i break down confusing financial speak and make it real. >> welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. mississippi, rated as the most unhealthy state in the nation, but fewer than three dozen people have signed up for health insurance at the federal
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website. we went there to find out why. >> this is a chef in mississippi. he's the sole provider for his family of four and says for the last year and a half, they haven't been able to afford insurance. >> i worry about that every day, because all it takes is one accident, and then you could be, you know, $20,000 to $100,000 in debt or more than that. you just neve know. >> he says he and his wife are searching for health care, but couldn't get on the new federal health care exchange website. in jackson, barbershop owner chris page and his customer terry harper have insurance, but both plan to look at their options under the a.c.e. >> i may get better coverage for the same amount i'm paying, i've got the minimum level coverage so that i could have something to cover me if something were to happen. >> neither have gone on line to
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compare rates. >> i haven't, because they're saying every time you try to go log in, it was something wrong with why you couldn't sign up, and you had some computer glitches. >> mississippi is the only tate that applied to run its own health care he can change and was rejected. the federal government turned it down on concerns the state wouldn't provide enough support for it. that leaves people here trying to use the troubled federal exchange. mississippi's insurance commissioner says as of october 21, only 35 people had signed up. health care advocates are playing catch up. >> a lot of the advocacy groups, provider groups, did a lot of work preparing for a mississippi-based exchange. we've been behind other states in trying to get the word out about the exchange. >> jarvis is training to be a navigator, helping people deem with the new health care marketplace. >> our focus is going to be
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enrolling in mississippi. >> that may be he haar said than done, because many residents don't have internet access for even computers. >> mississippi is the unhealthiest state in the nation. it also has the third highest premiums in the country under the new health care exchanges. mississippi only received $1 million in federal aid to public size the plan. neighboring arkansas received $24 million. >> the university of mississippi medical center got most of that money, $800,000. its navigators have helped almost 4,000 patients. cover mississippi.org, which got less money is mapping out a statewide outreach effort to bring computers to the people. >> there's definitely a need for more funding in mississippi. we're a state you to have knock on doors to help people enroll in these plans and actually walk people through the process. >> chris miller may take another look at new health care exchanges, but with him wait until the federal website is
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more reliable. >> that number was correct, all 35 people in mississippi who signed up for the insurance did so with provider magnolia. the only other carrier offering the policies in the state is human in a. that company is now in a slow period until third quarter earnings are released next month. >> parts of the west getting hit with another taste of snow. for more, we turn to nicole mitchell. >> i get the distinct impression that del doesn't like snow. he his nose wrinkles when he says it. we were very quiet here last week, under a ridge of high pressure, meaning temperatures were mild, we are very dry. that pattern has definitely changed. you can see the weather system moving through the region. the rest of the country, a couple of showers southward. this is our big player and will stay so the next couple of days.
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the different advisories, this is a lot. i can't find somewhere to stand without standing in front of something. let's start with the winter side. all the areas in the darker blue, these are actual winter storm warnings. a lot of montana under this. we see snow in billings. it's the combination of snow in lower elevations that could go up to six inches. higher elevations over that total, and wind will make it very difficult, rusing that visibility, especially if you're driving, and more chances for snow heading south ward. already creatings areas of snow. we had a pink color on there that was parts of nebraska into colorado, seeing a little bit of that or into wyoming. it gets very slick, making it treacherous. wind warnings from the northwest
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to parts of california, utah. some winds could go over 60 miles per hour. that is going to make driving treacherous. this will spread into the midwest with a heavy course of rain. >> i don't mind snow, i just don't like the cold. >> hundreds of migrants have died trying to reach europe, mow of them drowning in the mediterranean sea when boats crashed. those victims are fleeing improv issued or war torn nations. >> it's been voted the most beautiful beach in europe, but how easy it is to forget the drama and tragedy that plays out every day just a few miles offshore. the italian navy has sent one of its biggest ships to help with the crisis. we were allowed onboard and in the hold, found a pathetic
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cargo, 318 people picked up at sea the previous night. most of the africans are young men. they paid smugglers thousands of dollar to say flee their country. >> it is very dangerous, so many young persons. >> then there are the syrians of all ages. none of them know what will happen next. some are too young to understand where they are. they're registered straight away. the navy will take them directly to sicily. this is not just an italian problem. >> definitely not, because the biggest part of these immigrants wish to go in germany, norway, other parts of europe that at this moment have a more flourishing economy. this is an historical situation
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in which people are leaving their homeland because of the change of the climate, because of wars, it's a massive activity. >> this is the center which the italian authorities built to house migrants. there's always a lot more than capacity these days. at the moment, there are 700 inside. we were no the given permission to enter, so through the fence, we spoke to muhammed from damascus. >> how was his sea journey? >> so dangerous, the waves and the sea, too dangerous. >> what do you want now? what is your dream for the future? >> to complete my studies, to
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have respect. >> this was a sleepy place known for fisherman and sunsetses, but now is the island which people risk everything to reach. >> we turn now the world series. >> also world series going on. talk about shifting gears, we've seen gears the world series has never seen before. we saw the first ever to end in an obstruction call. sunday had another game ending first. bottom of the third, no score. mat carpenter on second, carlos beltran singles to right center, the cardinals take a 1-0 lead. top of the fifth, red sox with
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the bases loaded, nobody out, lifts one to left. ortiz tags from third and lumbers home like the big old oak tree that he is. that's all boston would get in the in this. next inning, two on that, two out, gomes wasn't even supposed to start this game, but comes up big no the place of shane victorino, a three-run home run gives boston a 4-1 lead. bottom of the eighth, cards trail by two. a runner in scoring position. john lackey on in relief, a ground out to short. bottom of the ninth, pinch-runner colton log is about to make history. beltran at the plate, he gets picked off first to end the game. first walk off pick off in world series history. red sox even the series by winning 4-2. jessica taft was there. >> the red sox showed their character tonight by put thank heartbreaking game three loss behind them and focusing on game
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four. the guy who was the star of the show wasn't even supposed to be in the start i can lineup. jonny gomes in for the injured shane victorino, making the start gets the huge three-run homer in the sixth inning. that gave the red sox a 4-1 lead and proves to be the game winner. the series is tied at two games appease. >> if there's one thing i've fought for, that's the opportunity, whether a pinch-hit, a uniform, or whether that's a start, you know, when my number's called, i got to be ready, that's why i got in the box and took some hacks. >> we needed it. we had a good offensive team and i know that we have guys capable to get it done. they got good pitching, but they turned the ball over the plate. >> for the second night in a row, the game ends in an unlikely manner, but this time, advantage red sox.
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both team next sending their aces to the hill, adam wainwright and jon lester. game time is 80 february p.m. eastern time. in st. louis, jessica chaff. >> knew sample from the nfl buffet. kansas city, the chiefs were busy trying to stay unbeaten and untied. don't let the fact that the chiefs led this one fool you. jason campbell threw for nearly 300 yards and almost kept the browns life. game on the line, best couldn't find the handle. k.c. wins 23-17 and move to 8-0. >> the game of the day went down in motown, calvin johnson takes the pass from stafford, gallops 87 yards. on fourth down, gives the lions the lead. fourth quarter, romo hits
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williams, who hits the accelerator, and 60 yards later, after taking a break for a little slick move by the way, that was nice, hit the end zone. dallas leads 20-10. they led by six. stafford hits johnson, 22 of his 329 yards receiving, seven yards shy of the nfl record. c.j.'s down at the one, staffed hustles everyone for clock pay. not paying attention, so stafford sneaks it up and over. reggie bush pushes him in just in case. they rally for the 31-30 win. >> you have been smiling ever since that victory. >> i'm still smiling now. >> thank you very much. >> a team of archaeologists have discovered history deep underground, dating back 200 years or more. we take a closer look.
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>> underneath several blocks of the island's south street sea port, the past and present have collided. over the last few years, maintenance with heavy machinery has been periodically interrupted to make way for more delicate work. >> as we're working east, we knew there was certainly a possibility of the finding some artifacts, so that's why we hired a team to assist us and work with us. >> a top team of archaeologies is called in to help preserve an era long gone. they've been wiping the dirt of thousands of relics, buried beneath the city, some dating back 250 years. >> we're getting a sense of how you new york city developed with, how it was bill, how people were living in the 18t 18th, 19th century. some things are very similar, stay the same and how things have changed throughout time. >> each piece is carefully cleaned, packaged and labeled.
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she and her team have been able to identify most of their findings. >> this is the broken end of a wig curler. >> and establish how they were used long before electricity. >> the things women do to look pretty. >> not just the women, the men. >> a toothbrush, and a syringe made of bone. in the early days, narc city was around the ports and docks and gradually expanded to outer neighborhoods. the team has been sharing their discoveries with younger generations. >> we can make history become more alive with the objects that people were using in day to day life as opposed to facts and physician and the names of famous people in a textbook. >> they top this will be made into a historical exhibit. >> it's a mix of old and new,
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old buildings along shiny new high rise says. people have been moving back to the neighborhood with a reminder of how life used to be just a few feet below. >> many artifacts not annual withstanding the test of time, but surviving the furry of super storm sandy approximate queens was hard hit. with us this morning is democratic congressman gregory weeks who represents new york's fifth congressional district. good morning. >> good morning, good being with you. >> how are things going in those particular areas? >> first, let me tell you how resilient the people are of rackaway and i know throughout all of new york. it's been a tough year. we have individuals not back in their homes, but yesterday, we were out with the democratic nominee for mayor, and we were talking about at breezy point. we saw homes that are being
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rebuilt, especially the area where homes were burned to the ground. we saw new beginnings. i was able to go to the alliance, where they just opened up another building to get back into some of the arts, which is important. we saw some of the devastating pictures and also some of the recovery. >> some of the people in those communities are saying the money, $648 million in federal funds set aside just not getting there fast enough. what is the problem? >> what i think is part of it is especially in new york city is the money that was to come to the rebuild, and it's a new program that fema had instituted, trying to lush from the mistakes of katrina and is trying to get those dollars into the hands of the individuals so that they can rebuild their homes and we can make sure we put up the preventive measures
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so we won't have the same devastation. we've got to figure out how we do that in a more efficient manner. we've got to make sure that happens in a more timely manner, so we can help as many more people. there was not a soul that lived on the peninsula that wasn't affected by the storm. the homeowners in one way, the apartment dwellers in another way, the businesses in another way. we have to fix it so all will get back. they're all interrelated. if one gets back quicker than the other, the balance is not there. >> how do you counter the perception, especially with the shutdown and i've got to be blunt, your approval rating is so low right now, it can't get lower, not your personal, but the cockal overall rating. how can you counter the suggestion that if congress could get along, more would get done? >> we've got to make sure we
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separate the two. surely starting off, we had the fighting congress to make sure to get the fundedding. some resisted getting the funding for the super storm. the entire delegation had to come together to fight for those dollars. now it is getting the money into the hands of the city of new york and state of new york and those programs that are designed and try to make sure that we coordinate better with the city to get the free flow of money into the hands of individuals i. federally, we've got to work on the insurance issue, dealing making sure the insurance rates don't go up. >> if i'm one of those people trying to hold on, how long is too long and how much longer do you think they will have to wait no. >> you know, it is tough. i tell individuals to hang in there, because you have to get back. unfortunately, folks are still recovering in katrina in new
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orleans or from katrina. we hope to do that in less time, but ask folks to stick in there, because we're going to work with them and try to make sure they are back and stronger than ever. >> how long is too long? >> every day is too long with you're out of your home, can't open your business or you don't have a job. we've got to expedite it. it's been too lock. >> thanks for being with us. >> my pleasure. >> congressman weeks, thanks for being with us this morning. >> still ahead, the youngest survivors of hurricane sandy had to grow up offensive after the hurricane hit. an emotional interview with the kids who lost so much, straight ahead.
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on august 20th, al jazeera america introduced
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>> for thousands of families hit hard by super storm sandy, it has been a long road to recovery. tomorrow marks a year since that storm devastated parts of new york and new jersey and some residents still rebuilding, also working and trying to raise a family at the same time. we continue our original series,
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surviving sandy. we have more. >> we've seen grown men and women break down crying over the stress of the storm and the recovery. while we can well imagine that thousands of children felt that same stress, we haven't heard much from them until now. i sat down with an inspire group of kids who shared their own personal stories, some expressing their feelings for the first time since sandy hit one year ago. >> we're right by a beach, so when the water came in, it was like a tsunami coming through our house. >> the water came so fast, we just had to get out of there. >> i was like are we going to lose our lives? >> i'm john, nine jeers old. >> i'm courtney. >> arnold. >> mattie. >> seven children from five families who all suffered when the storm hit one year ago. >> my dad was screaming for help out the window at the firemen, so we were waiting and waiting.
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my lizard was in a box, my bird in a box, my dog was all ready and they never came. >> i was in the hotel and that night, my brother and my father had stayed home, so we were like split, so we couldn't get in touch with them, so we thought they had died. >> when the storm passed, what did you think the next day? >> that i was safe. >> and that's all that mattered? >> everyone was okay, thank god, but yeah, like we didn't expect this to happen at all. >> i didn't really care about anything else, my house and all my stuff, i was just happy i was alive at that point. >> alive, yes, but their lives were turned upside down. >> like chairs in places i didn't think possible.
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>> i felt sad, because all of my toys were gone. >> for most, rebuilding was rough. >> it seems it's taking forever to get the house rebuilt. we had to stay in an apartment for six months, which i hated. >> some grew up fast, because everyone had to pitch in with the family recovery effort. >> when i say the word fema, do you have a good or bad reaction? >> good reaction. >> both. >> they just stopped helping us. we need the help, but they stopped. >> fema is not there to help you the entire way. you're supposed to help yourself with their help. >> school helped kids cope. >> my friends gave me supplies if i needed. >> so you liked going to school? >> others felt less safe at cool, since a couple of class might as were insensitive. >> all the girls started making fun of me and yelling at me, like go home and wash your clothes. i said i don't have a home to go home and wash my clothes. >> for those forced out of their
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homes, homework got harder. >> my grades went down, because we were in a hotel with five people. it was hard to study. >> now a year later. >> we're back in our house, and just looking out for each other. >> our lives, we have food to eat. nothing else really matters. >> as grown up as those perspectives seem, they are still kids who found fun along the way. >> when we were cleaning up the first day, my cousin was outside. i got bored, so i thought him with a power washer, not realizing how powerful that was. [ laughter ] >> a few found a silver lining. >> i saw my toys damaged, i was like wait second, new toys! >> they are the perfect example of how resilient kids can be, but there is no doubt this storm affected them. >> powerful piece. just for a brief moment there, we saw a mom. did the parents watch as you
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were talking to the kids. >> yes. mostly moms kind of off in the corner there and they were really listening intently. they were emotional, too. one mom told me that what her son spoke about his feelings, that was the first time that she had heard him speak about how the storm affected him. incredible learning experience i think for everybody. >> erika, thank you very much, reporting on the one year anniversary of sandy this morning. tomorrow is the actual first anniversary of that storm that did so much damage. our special series report continues at 7:00 and 8:00 tomorrow morning. that's it for now.
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♪ ♪ >> and you join me, david foster, for this al jazeera news hour. these are the stories we're covering in detail in the next 60 minutes. the u.n.-syrian envoy arrives in damascus. argentina's president loses ground midterm elections killing off her hopes of a third term in office. demanding answers and e.u. delegation heads to washington on claims thathe

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